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A 3E/3.5E Guide to the World of Greyhawk: An Annotated Bibliography
Posted on Thu, October 04, 2007 by ratlord
robbastard writes "As my final project for my Reference class in library school, I had to create an annotated bibliography. As I was free to choose any subject, I decided to merge one of my favorite recreational interests (Greyhawk) with my scholastic duties. The result is the following work, which includes an overview and short history of the setting.

A 3E/3.5E Guide to the World of Greyhawk: An Annotated Bibliography

By Rob Vest

Copyright 2007, All Rights Reserved

Introduction
This annotated bibliography focuses on materials relating to the World of Greyhawk, often referred to simply as "Greyhawk," a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. As a number of users are unfamiliar with the topic of this bibliography, an explanation is in order, not only of Greyhawk, but also of campaign settings and Dungeons & Dragons in general.

Dungeons & Dragons
Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG), a type of game in which players assume the role of fictional characters. Dungeons & Dragons itself is described as “part acting, part storytelling, part social interaction, part war game, and part dice rolling.” (1) One player, the Dungeon Master (DM), presents a variety of scenarios to the other players. The players interact with the scenarios (often called “adventures”) through “player characters” (PCs) they control. The DM controls multiple characters, called "non-player characters" (NPCs), which include both enemies (which are often monsters) and allies. The DM also acts as a referee, adjudicating rules, and sometimes settling disputes between players.

A group of D&D players will often play in a campaign. A campaign consists of a series of adventures, the NPCs involved, and events surrounding those adventures. (2) Campaigns take place in fictional “worlds” or “campaign settings” provided by the DM. A campaign setting provides “a consistent environment for the campaign.” (3) Though many DMs create their own worlds, some place their campaigns in settings from fiction or legend (such as Tolkien’s Middle Earth or Arthurian England), while others may use as setting created especially for D&D, such as the World of Greyhawk. It should be noted that though several DMs may use the same campaign world, they may change anything they wish within the context of their own campaign. (4)

The World of Greyhawk
The World of Greyhawk setting is as old as D&D itself. The setting was created when Wisconsin wargamer Gary Gygax began modifying the rules for Chainmail, a medieval wargame he had created in 1971 with fellow wargamer Jeff Perren. According to Gygax, he was inspired by some earlier modifications made to the rules by Dave Arneson, but felt those changes didn’t really fit into the game’s framework. Therefore, building onto Arneson’s rules, Gygax began developing both Dungeons & Dragons and the Greyhawk campaign. (5) Much of the activity in Gygax’s campaign initially took place in or near the City of Greyhawk, which would lend its name to the entire setting. (6)

While the first printing of Dungeons & Dragons was released in 1974, the Greyhawk campaign setting did not see print until 1980, when The World of Greyhawk Fantasy World Setting, a folio containing maps and information on some of the setting’s political states, was published. Though various works (supplements, adventures, articles in gaming magazines, and a novel by Andre Norton) making reference to Greyhawk appeared before 1980, this was the first time TSR (the publisher of D&D) had ever released an overview of the setting. In 1983, the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Game Setting, a boxed set containing significantly more information than the folio, was released. Several Greyhawk adventures and articles followed, as well as a line of novels for the setting.(7)

The “world” of the World of Greyhawk setting is “Oerth,” a planet slightly larger than our earth. (8) Though Oerth has four continents, (9) the vast majority of material published for the setting takes place in “the Flanaess,” the northeastern region of the continent of “Oerik,” roughly the size of Europe. Though populated mainly by humans, several other creatures also make their homes in the Flanaess, including dwarves, elves, drow (dark elves), halflings, gnomes, orcs, giants, dragons, goblins, and several other creatures of the D&D game. (10) Most cultures found in the Flanaess resemble those of medieval Europe, though faux Mongol, Arab, American Indian, Gypsy, Aztec, and African cultures are also represented. (11) Notable nations include: the Free City of Greyhawk, a cosmopolitan city-state; Ahlissa and the North Kingdom, feuding successor-states of the Great Kingdom which once ruled much of the Flanaess; the Scarlet Brotherhood, a monastic nation cleaving to a doctrine of racial purity; the Orcish Empire of the Pomarj; the elven nation of Celene; the Empire of Iuz, ruled by a demonic demigod; Keoland, a land where magic is viewed with superstition; and the chivalric realms of Furyondy and Nyrond. (12)

After Gygax left TSR in 1986, few materials for the setting were published. However, in 1988, TSR began releasing a “second” wave of Greyhawk products, beginning with Greyhawk Adventures, the first hardcover for the setting. The setting was converted to the 2nd Edition game rules in 1989 with the release of Fate of Istus, an adventure spanning several cities of the Flanaess. The City of Greyhawk was finally detailed in an eponymous boxed set that same year. (13)

The setting received a facelift in 1991 with the release of the Greyhawk Wars boxed set, which detailed the cataclysmic political changes brought about by a multinational war started by the demigod Iuz. These changes were further detailed the following year in From the Ashes, another boxed set which included a gazetteer and maps showing new political borders. More supplements and adventures supporting From the Ashes followed until 1993, after which the setting was supported solely by occasional articles in Dragon and Dungeon magazines until 1998. (14)

Greyhawk was revived in 1998 by Wizards of the Coast, which had purchased TSR the previous year. The first Greyhawk release from the new owners was the adventure Return of the Eight, which was soon followed by The Adventure Begins, a 1998 setting overview which updated the campaign calendar by six years. (15) Several more Greyhawk products were released until 2000, when Die Vecna Die!, the last adventure for the game’s 2nd Edition, was published.

Greyhawk was far from dead, however. The year 2000 also brought about the release of Dungeons & Dragons’ 3rd Edition (3E), the most comprehensive revision of the rules to date. The new edition also included Greyhawk as the “core setting.” The most obvious result of this was the inclusion of several of the setting’s deities in the game’s “core pantheon.” (16) The same year also saw the release of the Living Greyhawk Gazetteer, the most comprehensive treatment of the setting since 1992, as well as the debut of the Living Greyhawk campaign, a “shared campaign” administered by Wizards of the Coast’s Role-Playing Games Association (RPGA), in which massive numbers of players participate in a version of the setting conceived by the RPGA. (17)

The incorporation of Greyhawk into the core rules and the creation of the Living Greyhawk campaign have, ironically, resulted in that few Greyhawk-specific products have been released by Wizards of the Coast since 2000. Though the RPGA releases hundreds of free Living Greyhawk adventures, few people are allowed access to the entire selection. A wealth of Greyhawk material has appeared in Dragon and Dungeon (currently published under license by Paizo Publishing) over the last three years, but those magazines will be cancelled in September of 2007. (18) However, a new Greyhawk product, Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk, is set to be released in August. (19)

The Bibliography
Though Greyhawk-specific products are very rare in the game’s third and subsequent editions (a “3.5 Edition” was released in 2003), Greyhawk content is quite common. Unfortunately, such content is often buried deep within sourcebooks and thus easily overlooked. This bibliography will attempt to list and annotate all 3rd Edition and 3.5 Edition products released by Wizards of the Coast that have significant Greyhawk content. Products that only mention the setting in passing, or contain superficial references to Greyhawk characters (many spells, for instance, contain the names of Greyhawk NPCs) are not listed. Also not listed are articles and adventures published in Dragon and Dungeon (save for two hardback works containing reprints), and Living Greyhawk products, save for the Living Greyhawk Gazetteer mentioned above.

The primary users of this bibliography would be fans and authors of the setting. Though not likely to be used in most libraries, this bibliography would certainly find use in the private libraries of fans and industry professionals, as well as the corporate libraries of select RPG publishers.

Compilation
Compiling this bibliography was fairly easy, given the fact that the author has run games in the setting for over twenty years, owns several setting products, has written articles and reviews for Greyhawk fan websites, and is the administrator of a Greyhawk wiki. Information on products not owned was obtained via requests on internet message boards.

Acknowledgements
The author would like to thank the following people (identified by their messageboard screen names) for their aid in compiling this bibliography: Neon Knight, caeruleus, Frumpkis, rob_douglas, TwiceBorn, and Amaril from the Wizards of the Coast message boards; Crothian and Steel Wind from the ENWorld message boards; and Carlson from the GHOUL message boards. Their help has been greatly appreciated.

Footnotes
(1) Jonathan Tweet, et al., Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I v.3.5 (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003), 4.
(2) Monte Cook, et al., Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II v.3.5 (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003) 129.
(3) Ibid.
(4) Ibid.
(5) Gary Gygax, "Designers Forum: Gary Gygax on Dungeons & Dragons: Origins of the Game," Dragon 7 (1977): 7.
(6) Gary Gygax, “From the Sorcerer's Scroll: Greyhawk: the Shape of the World,” Dragon 37 (1980): 10.
(7) Roger E. Moore, The Adventure Begins (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 1998), 2.
(8) Roger E. Moore, “Measuring Up the Oerth,” Oerth Journal 3 (1996): 22.
(9) Moore, The Adventure Begins, 9.
(10) Ibid, 14-16.
(11) Gary Holian, et al., Living Greyhawk Gazetteer (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000), 5-8.
(12) Ibid, 21-25, 38-40, 45-47, 51-52, 58-66, 72-79, 86-88, 95-98.
(13) Moore, The Adventure Begins, 2.
(14) Ibid.
(15) Ibid.
(16) Jonathan Tweet, et al., Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000), 90-92.
(17) Holian, 191.
(18) Wizards of the Coast, “Paizo Publishing to Cease Publication of Dragon and Dungeon,” Wizards of the Coast, April 19, 2007, http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/news/20070419a (accessed July 30, 2007).
(19) Wizards of the Coast, “Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk,” Wizards of the Coast, n.d., http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=products/dndacc/109257200 (accessed July 30, 2007).


Works Cited
Cook, Monte, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams. Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II v.3.5. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

Gygax, Gary. "Designers Forum: Gary Gygax on Dungeons & Dragons: Origins of the Game." Dragon 7 (1977): 7.
---. “From the Sorcerer's Scroll: Greyhawk: the Shape of the World.” Dragon 37 (1980): 10- 11, 30.

Holian, Gary, Erik Mona, Sean K. Reynolds, and Frederick Weining. Living Greyhawk Gazetteer. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000.

Moore, Roger E. The Adventure Begins. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 1998.
---. “Measuring Up the Oerth.” Oerth Journal 3 (1996): 22-26.

Tweet, Jonathan, Monte Cook, and Skip Williams. Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I v.3.5. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

Tweet, Jonathan, Mike Donais, Skaff Elias, and Rob Heinsoo. Miniatures Handbook. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

Wizards of the Coast. “Paizo Publishing to Cease Publication of Dragon and Dungeon.” Wizards of the Coast, April 19, 2007. http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/news/20070419a (accessed July 30, 2007).
---. “Expedition to the Ruins of Greyhawk.” Wizards of the Coast, n.d. http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=products/dndacc/109257200 (accessed July 30, 2007).


A 3E/3.5E Guide to the World of Greyhawk: An Annotated Bibliography

*Baker, Richard. Complete Arcane. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2004.

This sourcebook contains the Suel Arcanamach prestige class, which discusses the powerful arcane magic of the ancient Suel Empire. This work also has a sidebar on Tarth Moorda, a warmage college commissioned by Duke Karl of Urnst, and hidden away in the Abbor-Alz hills.

*Baker, Richard, James Jacobs, and Steve Winter. Lords of Madness: The Book of Aberrations. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005.

This sourcebook introduces the Society of the Sanctified Mind, an organization with ties to the deity Saint Cuthbert; and the Topaz Order, an organization with ties to the god Heironeous. An NPC of the Topaz Order, Halvar Marth, is from the borders of the Gnarley Forest. The work also contains information on the dark god Tharizdun, and some details on the worship of Vecna among the neogi.

*Baur, Wolfgang, and Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel. Expedition to the Demonweb Pits. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2007.

This adventure, essentially an update of the classic 1980 Greyhawk adventure Queen of the Demonweb Pits, revisits the realm of the spider goddess Lolth. The work also features the demon lord Graz’zt and the dark elf priestess Eclavdra, both of whom were first introduced in Greyhawk products.

*Bonny, Ed, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Skip Williams, and Steve Winter. Monster Manual II. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2002.

This sourcebook updates the spawn of Kyuss, an undead monster associated with the Greyhawk demigod Kyuss, for 3rd Edition.

*Cagle, Eric, Jesse Decker, James Jacobs, Erik Mona, Matt Sernett, Chris Thomasson, and James Wyatt. Fiend Folio. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook has statistics and background information on the ulgurstasta, an undead creature created by the demigod Kyuss.

*Cagle, Eric, Jesse Decker, Jeff Quick, Rich Redman, and James Wyatt. Arms and Equipment Guide. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook contains descriptions of the magic weapons Blackrazor, Wave, and Whelm, first introduced in the 1979 adventure, White Plume Mountain.

*Carl, Jason. Sword and Fist. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook provides background information for the Knight Protectors of the Great Kingdom and the Knights of the Watch, two chivalric orders first introduced in the 1983 boxed set. The work introduces the Warmaster, a prestige class with ties to the Furyondan College of War. Also introduced are the Fists of Hextor and the Ravagers, organizations and prestige classes with ties to the gods Hextor and Erythnul, respectively.

*Collins, Andy, and Bruce R. Cordell. Epic Level Handbook. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2002.

This sourcebook contains statistics for Greyhawk NPCs Mordenkainen, Eclavdra, and Robilar. The work also provides details on the Axe of the Dwarvish Lords, a powerful magic weapon from the setting.

*Collins, Andy, and Bruce R. Cordell. Libris Mortis: The Book of Undead. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2004.

This sourcebook provides information on the death god Nerull, and introduces the King of the Ghouls, Doresain, as a demigod. Izrok Radja, a drow vampire NPC of the city of Erelhei-Cinlu, is introduced. The work also provides sample cults of Greyhawk deities Vecna and Wee Jas.

*Collins, Andy, David Noonan, and Ed Stark. Complete Warrior. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook is essentially an expansion and 3.5 Edition update of Sword and Fist. Complete Warrior includes entries for the Ravagers and the Knight Protectors from that work, as well as the Order of the Chalice from Defenders of the Faith.

*Collins, Andy, Skip Williams, and James Wyatt. Draconomicon. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook provides information on dragon deities and their relationships with various Greyhawk gods.

*Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2002.

This sourcebook introduces the goddess Scahrossar, sister of Greyhawk god Olidammara. The work includes information on Vecna’s role in creating the magical tome known as the Book of Vile Darkness, and provides details on the demon lord Graz’zt. Zagyg, a demigod of the setting, is also mentioned, as are two magic items of Greyhawk, the Iron Flask of Tuerny the Merciless and the Regalia of Evil.

*Cook, Monte. Return to the Temple of Elemental Evil. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This adventure revisits and expands upon the classic 1985 Greyhawk adventure, The Temple of Elemental Evil.

*Cook, Monte, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams. Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000.

This rulebook, along with the Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I, brings several Greyhawk deities into the “core setting.”

*Cook, Monte, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams. Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II v.3.5. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This work is an updated version of 2000’s Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II, and contains essentially the same Greyhawk content. However, the cover of this edition bears an image of the globe of Oerth.

*Cordell, Bruce R. Expanded Psionics Handbook. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2004.

This work contains information on the deity Zuoken.

*Cordell, Bruce R., and Skip Williams. Tome and Blood. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook contains information on the Bleak Academy, a necromantic organization with ties to the undead lich Acererak.

*Decker, Jesse. Complete Adventurer. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005.

This work is essentially a 3.5 Edition expansion of 2001’s Song and Silence. The League of Boot and Trail is included with a sidebar mentioning months found on the Greyhawk calendar. The work also introduces the Eyes of the Overking, an organization using terminology of the Great Kingdom of Aerdy.

*Decker, Jesse, James Jacobs, Tito Leati, David Noonan, Christopher Perkins, and Chris Thomasson. The Shackled City. Bellevue, WA: Paizo Publishing, 2005.

This hardbound book reprints several linked Greyhawk adventures previously published in Dungeon magazine, and includes new content.

*Decker, Jesse, David Noonan, Chris Thomasson, James Jacobs, and Robin D. Laws. Dungeon Master’s Guide II. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005.

This work provides extensive detail on the town of Saltmarsh, originally introduced to the setting in 1981’s The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh. The work also details a number of Greyhawk magic artifacts.

*Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, and David Noonan. Manual of the Planes. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook contains information on the realms of several Greyhawk deities, as well as a few demon lords of the setting.

*Gygax, Gary, and Jon Creffield. The Slayer’s Guide to Dragons. Swindon, England: Mongoose Publishing, 2002.

Though not published by Wizards of the Coast, this work coauthored by the setting’s creator contains an adventure, “The Revenge of Ghorkai,” which is easily set in Greyhawk. The map provided is a close copy of the equivalent region in the Flanaess, and the names of characters and places in the adventure are very similar to their Greyhawk equivalents. The adventure takes place in what should be the Yatil Mountains and involves a former servant of the “Mother of Witches,” who is obviously meant to be the Witch Queen Iggwilv.

*Holian, Gary, Erik Mona, Sean K. Reynolds, and Frederick Weining. D&D Gazetteer. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000.

This work is essentially an abridged version of the Living Greyhawk Gazetteer.

*Holian, Gary, Erik Mona, Sean K. Reynolds, and Frederick Weining. Living Greyhawk Gazetteer. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000.

This work is a 192-page overview of the Flanaess, with information on political states, inhabitants, geography, history, and deities. Despite the title, this sourcebook is considered applicable to all Greyhawk campaigns.

*Laws, Robin D., and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

This work contains a creation myth of Hell which mentions the roles of the deities Heironeous and Saint Cuthbert.

*Marmell, Ari, Anthony Pryor, Robert J. Schwalb, and Greg A. Vaughan. Drow of the Underdark. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2007.

This sourcebook, covering the dark elves of Dungeons & Dragons, is filled with numerous Greyhawk references, and provides extensive detail on the underground city of Erelhei-Cinlu, which first appeared in the 1978 adventure, Vault of the Drow.

*McArtor, Mike, and F. Wesley Schneider. Complete Scoundrel. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2007.

This sourcebook introduces Heward's Hall and Olidammara's Shell, legendary sites with ties to the deities Heward and Olidammara.

*Mona, Erik, ed. Dragon Compendium, Volume I. Bellevue, WA: Paizo Publishing, 2005.

This hardcover reprints several articles that first appeared in Dragon magazine. This work contains the Fleet Runner of Ehlonna, a prestige class with ties to the goddess Ehlonna; magic items with ties to deities; and the Ciruja Plant, a monster found in the Wormcrawl Fissure.

*Noonan, David. Complete Divine. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2004.

This sourcebook contains the Temple Raider of Olidammara prestige class from Song and Silence, as well as the Radiant Servant of Pelor, a prestige class with ties to the sun god Pelor. The work also includes information on several Greyhawk gods outside the “core pantheon.” In addition, Complete Divine contains details on the Theocracy of the Pale, a nation of the Flanaess.

*Noonan, David. Player’s Handbook II. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

This work includes a number of affiliations with ties to Greyhawk deities, such as the Order of the Chalice (Heironeous), The One & Five (Vecna), and the Sun Fane (Pelor).

*Noonan, David, and John D. Rateliff. Song and Silence. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook contains prestige classes and organizational information for the Royal Explorers of Keoland and Temple Raiders of Olidammara. The work also introduces the League of Boot and Trail, and organization with ties to the Royal Explorers and the god Fharlanghn.

*Redman, Rich, Skip Williams, and James Wyatt. Deities and Demigods. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook has statistics and information on every Greyhawk god in the “core pantheon.”

*Redman, Rich, and James Wyatt. Defenders of the Faith. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2001.

This sourcebook provides sample temples of Pelor, Wee Jas, and Erythnul, as well as details on the churches of several Greyhawk gods. The work also introduces the Order of the Chalice, an organization with ties to Heironeous.

*Sernett, Matthew, Dave Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb. Tome of Magic. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

This work provides information on the god Heironeous, as well as on Greyhawk characters Acererak and Dahlver-Nar.

*Stark, Ed, James Jacobs, and Erik Mona. Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

This sourcebook contains information on various subjects with ties to the setting. These include the Queen of Chaos, the Battle of Pesh, Miska the Wolf-Spider, Iggwilv, Graz’zt, Ilsidahur, and Saint Kargoth.

*Stark, Ed, Chris Thomasson, Rhiannon Louve, Ari Marmell, and Gary Astleford. Complete Champion. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2007.

This work contains information on the churches and holy sites of several Greyhawk deities, including Fharlanghn, Pelor, Olidammara, and Kord.

*Tweet, Jonathan, Monte Cook, and Skip Williams. Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000.

This rulebook, along with the Dungeon Master’s Guide: Core Rulebook II, brings several Greyhawk deities into the “core setting.”

*Tweet, Jonathan, Monte Cook, and Skip Williams. Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I v.3.5. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This work is an updated version of 2000’s Player’s Handbook: Core Rulebook I, and contains essentially the same Greyhawk content.

*Tweet, Jonathan, Mike Donais, Skaff Elias, and Rob Heinsoo. Miniatures Handbook. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook introduces monsters called “aspects,” which are essentially powered- down versions of deities. This work details aspects of the deities Kord, Hextor, Lolth, Nerull, and Vecna.

*Williams, Skip, Penny Williams, Ari Marmell, and Kolja Raven Liquette. Complete Mage. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006.

This work details a number of Greyhawk-themed arcane locations, including: Bigby's Tomb, Boccob's Reading Room, and the Crypt of Wee Jas. The work also includes the magic items Staff of Malediction (created by Vecna's priesthood) and Heward's Fortifying Bedroll.

*Wyatt, James, Christopher Perkins, and Darrin Drader. Book of Exalted Deeds. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003.

This sourcebook contains information on the Cup and Talisman of Al’Akbar, and the Regalia of Good, magic artifacts of the setting.
"
 
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