Username Password
   or Create an Account
HomeForumsFAQArticlesReviewsDownloadsLinksTop 20Feedback
 Features
 
Greyhawk Wiki
Is Down :(


 
Naval Cultures of the Flanaess - Sustenance Providers
Posted on Sat, September 27, 2008 by Dongul
Crag writes "Sustenance Providers: “As the land surrenders its bounty to feed the people; so will the sea.” – Hunter Chlula

Naval Cultures of the Flanaess
Sustenance Providers

By Crag

Sustenance Providers: “As the land surrenders its bounty to feed the people; so will the sea.” – Hunter Chlula

The Flanaess has evolved into a cultural melting pot of several diverse peoples; this diversity has stimulated various cultural approaches regarding the value of the sea and vessels required to exploit it. Cultural beliefs of the sea within a society have a profound effect regarding its fleet composition and the military doctrine that is developed to achieve the desired goals within the society.

Naval Doctrine: The oldest inhabitants of the Flanaess have not desired to explore beyond the seaward horizon. Few flan tribes have had interest in the ocean at all. A lack of naval competition ensured few naval disputes. With no naval conflicts, a naval philosophy was not developed. The few tribes who sought sustenance from the sea did so for environmental reasons. Those tribes viewed the sea solely as another hunting ground from which to feed themselves. The oeridian and suloise immigrants were much more aggressive regarding naval concerns. The oeridians and suloise drove the flan from the seas; many of the flan tribes assimilated their naval philosophies and vessels. The flan tribes which chose to retain the traditional sustenance perspective were soon relegated to minor coastal fishing in isolated areas or dependant upon the sufferance of regional naval powers. Some notable naval fleets that adhere to this doctrine are: Blackmoor, Rovers of the Barrens and Coltens Feodality of Stonehold.

Flannae (Environmental Protection & Divination)
Curragh (Merchant)

- Beyond desolate wasteland; a forlorn people struggle to survive –

The women and children weep with hunger; does hope remain…
As the people were driven from the plains, the huddled survivors were forced to look to the northern sea for sustenance. Old tales and forgotten legends are recalled before the meager fires. With no news from the south and too fearful to brave the wastes again; many despair that the small group of bands that followed Durishi Great Hound north is all that remains of a once noble people.

Moons pass; the people gather nightly, hoping the Ataman will leave his tent. Instead old hunter chlula enters the firelight and speaks of tales of times before the first outlanders arrived, when the people walked under every horizon and sailed every water. It is so; once in the distant past our people sailed the rivers and seas. If the people are to live again, we must reclaim that lost time. The old tale of “Mulsigan the seal eater” describes the craft he built to satisfy his hunger. Some hunters have tried to build such craft, many have failed and their sacrifice has caused us even more grief but one floats above the waves.

The shamans can predict the weather and with the ancestors’ blessings, hunters can survive the bitter icy water, we can hunt the sea creatures once more. Our ancient ancestors braved the deep waters in Curragh. These craft were once used in the distant past by providers to hunt the sea creatures that Beory nourishes. Our people can build them and venture forth on the sea. They require much courage from the providers who use them, especially in the ice filled northern waters. The ship sinks rapidly if the hide ruptures but with a few more men willing to brave the perils of these new hunting grounds; we can fill the bellies of the people.

I know I ask much; hides and sinew mean less shelter but I ask it nonetheless. I speak to the hunters, for now forget the javelin and lariat; the bear and horse of our youth. This night, dream of the harpoon and net; of seal and fish. I have suffered also, the sole remaining grandchild of my blood hungers, her cries gnaw at my pride. We have been through much, suffered much but I am willing to suffer still more if it will silence those cries in the night.

Once those cries are heard no more and muscles become firm once again, we can dream of other things. Of women and offspring that look to their elders with pride. Of full bellies and tales told around warm fires, until the people are once again strong enough to reclaim their birthright beyond the desolate wastes. I ask not for myself but for all those honoured ancestors before me and the children my granddaughter shall one day suckle at her breast. I say here and now, the time of struggle is yet to end but the time of despair is ended this night.

Be frugal and Beory will fill your belly.
"
 
 Related Links
  · More about Peoples & Culture
· News by Dongul


Most read story about Peoples & Culture:

Languages of the Flanaess

 
 Article Rating
 
Average Score: 4.5
Votes: 2


Please take a second and vote for this article:

Excellent
Very Good
Good
Regular
Bad

 
 Options
 
 Printer Friendly Printer Friendly

 
"Login" | Login/Create an Account | 0 comments
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren't responsible for their content.

No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register


Canonfire! is a production of the Thursday Group in assocation with GREYtalk and Canonfire! Enterprises

Contact the Webmaster.  Long Live Spidasa!

PHP-Nuke Copyright © 2005 by Francisco Burzi. This is free software, and you may redistribute it under the GPL. PHP-Nuke comes with absolutely no warranty, for details, see the license.
Page Generation: 0.20 Seconds