Username Password
   or Create an Account
HomeForumsFAQArticlesReviewsDownloadsLinksTop 20Feedback
 Features
 
Greyhawk Wiki

 
Canonfire :: View topic - Called Shots and Critical Hits
Called Shots and Critical Hits

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Canonfire Forum Index -> Greyhawk- D&D 3.0e/3.5e/d20/Pathfinder
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Dark_Lord_Galen
Paladin
Paladin


Joined: Sep 07, 2011
Posts: 827
Location: Houston Texas

PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 6:29 pm    Post subject: Called Shots and Critical Hits Reply with quote

Had a debate around Natural D20s and the applications of them in called shots & Critical Hits .
As I see it there are NO called shots in the standard rules.
As for "crit" hits are based on weapon type. Further, on Crits, 1 twenty is the "chance" the second confirms, I am having issues around the third confirming a "kill".
Any have thoughts or detail around how they manage this particular element?
remember this is as it relates to 3.5e I recall there was elements that defined it in 2e
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DarkHerald
Journeyman Greytalker


Joined: Feb 06, 2011
Posts: 201
Location: South Africa, Cape Town

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dont make use of the "confirm roll rule," I really dont think it is needed.

In my campaign if a CRIT is scored the player then gets to roll his damage and multiple the result by the weapons CRIT modifier. He then adds all the additional bonuses for magic, strength, etc. Only with a CRIT do I allow players to re-roll 1's

The reason I do this is because I believe that all other factors like strength, magic, training are constant, but the damage you roll for your weapon is not, it is avariable.

If a natural 20 is rolled then the player doesn't need to roll for the weapon damage, the damage of the weapon is MAX and multiplied by the weapons CRIT modifier and then all bonuses are added.

If a player rolls a 1 it is considered a fumble. He automatically provokes an attack of opportunity from all threatend squares. If there are no enemies then he acts last in the following round.

Called shots I havent looked at in a while but would impose a -2 to a -10 penalty depending on what effect is required.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dark_Lord_Galen
Paladin
Paladin


Joined: Sep 07, 2011
Posts: 827
Location: Houston Texas

PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2012 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DarkHerald wrote:
Only with a CRIT do I allow players to re-roll 1's.

Interesting Twist. I can see the justification, as a "crit" is less likely to do minimum damage.
DarkHerald wrote:

If a natural 20 is rolled then the player doesn't need to roll for the weapon damage, the damage of the weapon is MAX and multiplied by the weapons CRIT modifier and then all bonuses are added.

Confused??? Meaning that in the case of a long sword, the "crit value multiplier" is 19-20, So If I understand the combined elements above you have penned, then a re-roll would be at 19 and a max damage at 20 based on the attack roll?
DarkHerald wrote:

If a player rolls a 1 it is considered a fumble. He automatically provokes an attack of opportunity from all threatend squares. If there are no enemies then he acts last in the following round.

I do the first part as well, LIKE the second part, doesn't let them off so easy eh? hehe
DarkHerald wrote:

Called shots I havent looked at in a while but would impose a -2 to a -10 penalty depending on what effect is required.

That was my first instinct as well, but didn't want to set a precedent I would have to either live with or (as they say in this part of the world hehe) crawfish on. Further, the game combat matrix really doesn't support that level of detail. I have read NUMEROUS debated articles all the way back to the dawn and the consensus is they don't belong.
Thanks for the feedback DH... seems this is a topic that most seem reluctant to debate. Me being ole school 1e /2e the whole "crit" thing seems just a way to soften the combat. (and before Rasgon chimes in, I remember it was in 2e, just didn't use it Laughing )
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DarkHerald
Journeyman Greytalker


Joined: Feb 06, 2011
Posts: 201
Location: South Africa, Cape Town

PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What I mean was that if a fighter with a STR 18, a sword +1 rolls a 19 and is using a long sword he would then roll 1d8 x the result by 2 and then add bonuses. i.e. 6x2 =12 +4 +1 = 17HP of damage.

Now if he rolled a natural 20 then he would not roll for damage he would take the maximum he could roll x by 2 and add the modifiers.

i.e. 8x2 =16 +4 +1 = 21HP.

my rule is based on the rule from COMBAT & TACTICS 2e rules.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
tulkas
Apprentice Greytalker


Joined: Jan 19, 2004
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dark Herald

Please take a look at Torn Asunder. I do not remember the publisher at this moment. This book is devoted to critical hits.

I have been tossing around the idea of critical hit rules to my regular campaign players, but no one has seemed excited enough to try it out yet.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cebrion
Black Hand of Oblivion
Black Hand of Oblivion


Joined: Feb 16, 2003
Posts: 3723
Location: So. Cal

PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 12:21 am    Post subject: Re: Called Shots and Critical Hits Reply with quote

Dark_Lord_Galen wrote:
Had a debate around Natural D20s and the applications of them in called shots & Critical Hits .
As I see it there are NO called shots in the standard rules.
As for "crit" hits are based on weapon type. Further, on Crits, 1 twenty is the "chance" the second confirms, I am having issues around the third confirming a "kill".

You explanation on how critical hits work seems...off. The process is, roll high enough to be in weapon's critical hit range (usually a 20, though some critical ranges are 19-20, and a few are even 18-20), then roll again and merely hit successfully, though not necessarily within the critical range again (unless that high of a roll is needed to hit in the first place). If the second roll to hit is successful, it is a critical hit.

Example:

Schlub the half-orc has a total of is +7 to hit with his +1 longsword. He attacks a goblin with an AC of 15. Schlub only needs to roll an 8 to hit the goblin's AC of 15, but rolls a 19. That may be a critical hit, as a longsword has a critical hit range of 19-20. The critical hit must be confirmed though. Schlub only needs to roll an 8 to confirm the critical hit, as he only needs an 8 to hit the goblin to begin with. He rolls and 11, and the critical hit is confirmed. Schlub rolls a d8 for the sword's basic damage (he rolls a 7) and adds his +4 Strength bonus and the sword's magic bonus of +1. He then rolls another d8 for the sword's basic damage (he rolls a 4) and adds his +4 Strength bonus and the sword's magic bonus of +1 again. Those two sets of damage, which are added together, represent the longsword's x 2 critical hit multiplier. Schlub deals a total of 21 hit points of damage to the goblin- the 6 h.p. goblin is brutally hacked in two. Evil Grin
_________________
- Moderator/Admin (in some areas)/Member -


Last edited by Cebrion on Sat May 11, 2013 8:00 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bugsy
Journeyman Greytalker


Joined: Feb 05, 2013
Posts: 86
Location: Deep within the Fellreev Forest

PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tulkas wrote:
Dark Herald

Please take a look at Torn Asunder. I do not remember the publisher at this moment. This book is devoted to critical hits.

I have been tossing around the idea of critical hit rules to my regular campaign players, but no one has seemed excited enough to try it out yet.


Torn Asunder is an interesting book - I've used bits of it in the past.

IMC I use a Critical system like so: A roll of a crit. threat (say 19-20) must be confirmed. If it's confirmed, it does 2x damage (or whatever). If another crit threat number is rolled (19-20, say), then I use a special chart I made based on an old I.C.E. chart (don't ask me what or where) This requires a d100 roll that goes from gory descriptions all the way to instant death for the target.

On a roll of a 1, there is a 'Fumble Threat'. A d20 is rolled again, and if it is another miss (it must miss by 10) then I have a d100 chart that indicates anything from a dropped weapon to a broken weapon to hitting one's self or adjacent party members.

My players have always found this system to be a lot of fun, since I use it for bad guys as well. There have been some hilarious fumbles thru the years. And recently in my Bandit Kingdoms game on rpol, a low level scout killed two orcs with one arrow on a very high rolled critical.

Called shots is something I've never allowed, because I've never sen a system for it that wouldn't be abused or unbalance play.
_________________
<div>&nbsp;Is THIS your card? How about THIS one? No?</div>
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Canonfire Forum Index -> Greyhawk- D&D 3.0e/3.5e/d20/Pathfinder All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Canonfire phpBB2 theme by Jakob Persson (http://www.eddingschronicles.com).
Powered by phpBB © 2001 phpBB Group
All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Stone textures by Patty Herford
Ported for PHP-Nuke by nukemods.com
Forums ©


Canonfire! is a production of the Thursday Group in assocation with GREYtalk and Canonfire! Enterprises

Contact the Webmaster.  Long Live Spidasa!

PHP-Nuke Copyright © 2005 by Francisco Burzi. This is free software, and you may redistribute it under the GPL. PHP-Nuke comes with absolutely no warranty, for details, see the license.
Page Generation: 0.27 Seconds