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    Canonfire :: View topic - Blackmoor Information
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    Blackmoor Information
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    Apprentice Greytalker

    Joined: Aug 01, 2011
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    Fri Aug 26, 2011 6:03 pm  
    Blackmoor Information

    My current weekend game (not the one I am doing a Campaign Journal for) is set in the nation of Blackmoor, and I am trying to find as much information as I can about this frozen land

    I am curious if anyone knows if there are any articles in Dragon/Dungeon, or anything else that I might be able to easily find.

    I am also trying to decide on how much information to use from the d20 Blackmoor book by Zeitgeist Games. Generally if anyone has any tips or experience with Blackmoor it would be appreciated.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Fri Aug 26, 2011 6:46 pm  

    You definitely want to check out Oerth Journal #5 for Frederick Weining's excellent article "The Archbarony of Blackmoor."
    Journeyman Greytalker

    Joined: Sep 12, 2005
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    Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:54 pm  

    There are two 3E Dungeon Adventures set there:

    Dungeon 115 Raiders of the Black Ice

    and

    Dungeon 126 The Clockwork Fortress

    Pretty sure there are some LG Core modules set in the area if you can lay your hands on them. Think the Burning Cliffs was a Core Special at one point as well.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Sat Aug 27, 2011 6:54 am  

    @ Flint: Burning Cliffs is a Iuz Border State module it would seem. Took me a while to find it among my LG stuff. Thank you very much for those two Dungeon adventures they had very nice maps that I have yoinked.

    @ Pesh: Thank you for pointing me to that Oerth Journal it was very helpful!
    Adept Greytalker

    Joined: Jul 29, 2006
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    From: Dantredun, MN

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    Sun Aug 28, 2011 2:34 pm  

    That OJ writeup is both my favorite Blackmoor source and probably my all time favorite OJ article. Also check out the two-part RJK fiction about the City of the Gods in a later issue.

    The GH Adventures hardback is the original source on the Burning Cliffs: http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~leirbakk/rpg/adnd/society/adnd_society_greyhawkplaces.html
    It also describes a nearby location called Rigodruok in the Land of Black Ice. If you have the full book, there's a magic item or two relevant to Blackmoor in another chapter.

    "Fiend's Embrace" in Dungeon 121 takes place in the nearby Cold Marshes. It contains a small map of the marshes and a minor mention of a (dead) NPC from Blackmoor.

    Return to the Temple of the Frog can be freely downloaded here: http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/oa/20070223a

    Finally, Jeffrey Talanian's Charnel Crypt of the Sightless Serpent is not only a great adventure, but it's just begging to be placed in Greyhawk's Blackmoor: http://www.swordsmen-and-sorcerers.com/store

    Edit: The "Alien Devices" chapter from DA3 used to be available online, but it looks like WotC finally took down their old edition downloads. Here's the old link if you feel like doing from Google sleuthing: www.wizards.com/dnd/files/Blackmoor.txt
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    GreySage

    Joined: Aug 03, 2001
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    From: Michigan

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    Mon Aug 29, 2011 2:09 pm  

    vestcoat wrote:

    It also describes a nearby location called Rigodruok in the Land of Black Ice.


    "Nearby" is relative. I think the original intent of the authors was that Rigodruok was relatively near Blackmoor, and that it was the "City of the Gods" vaguely alluded to in the Greyhawk boxed set. The description given of the City of the Gods there, "a place where iron buildings tower and it is summer year round," describes Rigodruok exactly.

    However, in The Adventure Begins, Roger E. Moore stated that Rigodruok was actually located on Oerth's geographic north pole, making it "beyond the Land of Black Ice" but on another continent altogether. And the City of the Gods became an entirely different place.

    This is to the good, I think. A Guide to the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Setting actually mentioned two places associated with the Land of Black Ice that Greyhawk Adventures turned into only one. The first, "they are said to tell of a warmer land beyond the ice where the sun never sets and jungles abound" obviously fits Rigodruok, and the second, the place between the Land of Black Ice and Blackmoor territory, is the land where "iron buildings tower." Greyhawk Adventures put the iron buildings in Rigodruok beyond the Ice.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Mon Aug 29, 2011 8:58 pm  

    vestcoat wrote:
    Edit: The "Alien Devices" chapter from DA3 used to be available online, but it looks like WotC finally took down their old edition downloads. Here's the old link if you feel like doing from Google sleuthing: www.wizards.com/dnd/files/Blackmoor.txt


    From Google cache:

    Quote:
    Blackmoor.txt

    This is the original description of Blackmoor items, published in
    DA3 City of the Gods, 1987, a setting that was a part of what later
    became the world of Mystara (DUNGEON & DRAGONS(R) Game, Expert).


    ALIEN DEVICES


    The alien technology in this module includes many powerful devices
    that can be acquired and used by the PCs. While you, the DM, know
    that these items are simple tools or mechanical devices, residents
    of Blackmoor perceive them to be magic items and treat them
    accordingly, giving each a name that expresses its power in
    understandable terms.

    This section lists all of the common alien devices corresponding to
    magic items. Each item is listed by its proper name, followed in
    parentheses by the name by which the item is known to non-aliens.
    Each listing has a short description of how the item appears to
    non-aliens, followed by a discussion of its functions.

    Alien devices are made from super-tough ceramics and acrylics and
    from other exotic substances. Unless otherwise noted, they can't be
    harmed by non-magical weapons or tools. Also, unless otherwise
    noted, all items that use a power pack are powered by the same type
    of 1" x 2" x 1/2" pack, and all power packs are fully charged when
    discovered (minus any charges used during the encounter or melee in
    which the PCs discover them); all standard power packs are
    interchangeable. Used power packs can be recharged in Beagle 's
    power plant (which is in a high security area not open to the PCs).
    In some cases, alien devices are activated or controlled by voice
    command. Generally, these devices understand only Galactica (the
    language of the Galactic Federation) and the coded battle languages
    of the Federation Fleet. They do not respond to Common unless
    specially programmed to do so. Often, items respond only to special
    codes given in a battle language.

    Alien devices aren't intended for use by non-technological species.
    It is especially easy for those not trained in their use (e.g. the
    PCs) to improperly insert a power pack, thus damaging the item.
    Each time one of the PCs tries to change a power pack, there is a
    50% chance that he damages it so that it no longer functions.

    Battle Armor (Godsuit)

    Description: This item looks like a smooth, wondrously light and
    thin stocking but one that has been knit with arms and legs to
    cover the entire body. Woven into the stocking's neck is a small
    oblong box.

    Functioning: All aliens and Soldiers of the Frog wear this tough
    battle armor, a type of form-fitting, light-weight acrylic mesh. A
    sensor in the "oblong box" tells the suit when it is being worn and
    causes it to emit a repulsion field that gives the wearer AC 0 without adding to his encumbrance. The
    "oblong box" contains a
    standard power pack. Squeezing the box in the palm of the hand
    causes it to eject its power pack. A new pack can then be slid into
    the box. Each new pack powers the armor for 4 months. Power packs
    already in suits discovered by the PCs are good for 1-4 months.

    Communicator (Talk Box)

    Description: This item is a gray egg-shaped device that fits in the
    palm of the hand. A retractable metal clip extrudes from one end.

    Functioning: This communicator lets the user have a two-way
    conversation with anyone who has an implant or communicator or with
    any device that is plugged into the alien communications network (a
    computer, for example). Communicators have a range of 48 miles.
    They can always receive anything being transmitted on their band.
    When in transmit mode, they transmit all sounds within 12" inches.
    A character activates a communicator by giving the transmit signal
    (a verbally communicated alphanumeric code, in most cases). The
    small clip is a belt clip that can be thumbed out for carrying or
    thumbed out of the way when the device is in use. If the user tells
    the communicator to "translate", it automatically translates
    everything that it receives into whatever language the user is
    speaking. His own words are not translated. Squeezing the base of
    the device causes it to eject its power pack. A new power pack can
    then be slid into the base. Each pack can power the device for six
    hours of continuous use (about 24 conversations).

    Glow Wand (Magic Torch)

    Description: This item is a six-inch long, one-inch diameter gray
    metal tube with a translucent cap of some smooth, dense material at
    one end. The tube has parallel ridges running along its length.

    Functioning: The item is a sophisticated portable light source. The
    "cap" is actually a combination lens/light source. To make it emit
    light, the user twists it clockwise. The lens immediately begins to
    cast a diffused glow. The further it is turned, the brighter and
    more focused the light becomes. Turning the lens in the opposite
    direction decreases and diffuses the light. Turning it all the way
    in the opposite direction shuts the light off. The glow wand is
    powered by a standard power pack inside the tube. The pack can be
    removed or replaced by pressing against one of the tube's ridges,
    causing an access panel to spring open. The panel snaps shut when
    pressed back into place. Each power pack is good for 24 hours of
    operation.

    Grenade (Death Egg)

    Description: This item is a smooth, heavy, egg-shaped ball, no more
    than an inch thick at its widest end. There is a small seam in the
    middle of the ball. The ball comes in six colors: red, yellow,
    black, blue, green, and gray.

    Functioning: Each grenade can be thrown (up to 60 feet) or fired
    from a grenade launcher. However, if the grenade is inactive (its
    normal state), it can be thrown or fired all day, and nothing will
    happen. Before it can explode, it must first be active (or live, as
    the aliens say). To make a grenade active, it is necessary to twist
    the two ends in opposite directions until there is a click. The
    grenade then explodes five seconds later. The effect of the
    explosion depends on the grenade's type. The different colors
    indicate different types. These include:

    Gamma (red): This type emits a powerful blast of radiation. All
    entities within 30 feet must Save vs. Death Ray. Those who fail
    their saving throw sustain 8-48 points of damage. Those who make
    their saving throw sustain no damage. Gamma grenades do no damage
    to the surrounding area.

    Light (yellow): This type creates a globe of light 60 feet across.
    It is similar that created by the magic user spell continual light,
    but it lasts only one turn. Those who are looking directly at the
    grenade when it first explodes must make a Saving Throw vs. Spells.
    Those who fail the saving throw are blinded for one round. Those who
    make their saving throw are unaffected.

    Opacity (black): This type creates a globe of darkness 60 feet
    across. It is similar to that created by reversing the magic user
    spell continual light, but it lasts only one turn. Opacity grenades
    can't be used to blind characters.

    Sonic (blue): This type emits a destructive, but focused, blast of
    sound. All entities within 5 feet must Save vs. Paralysis. Those
    who fail their saving throw sustain 12-48 points of damage and are
    paralyzed for the next 6 turns. Those who make their saving throw
    are unaffected. Sonic grenades destroy all furniture and fragile
    items within range. They damage doors just as if the door was a
    character. If and only if they explode while wedged against a wall
    or floor, they blow a hole in the surface (one-foot thick, if the
    surface is stone or metal; three-feet thick if it is earth or
    wood).

    Neuron (green): This type emits a cloud of mild nerve gas. All
    entities within 30 feet who aren't wearing a functioning pressure
    suit must Save vs. Breath Attack. Those who fail their saving throw
    sustain 1-4 points of damage and are paralyzed for the next 6
    turns. Those who make their saving throw are unaffected. Neuron
    grenades don't affect machines (including robots), golems, living
    statues, or inanimate objects. The gas need not be breathed to be
    effective - it just has to touch an exposed surface. However, armor
    and clothing are no protection from the gas.

    Tangler (gray): This type emits a dense monofilament web that
    twists itself around whatever it encounters. All entities within 10
    feet must Save vs. Magic Wands. Those who fail their saving throw
    sustain 1-4 points of damage and are entangled in the web. They
    can't move until they are cut free. Those who make their saving h) 0*0*0* throw are
    unaffected. It is necessary to inflict 3-18 points of
    damage on the web in order to free each entangled character. Only
    magic blades and acid affect the web. Since the web responds to
    resistance by tightening around its source, characters who try to
    struggle free of the web sustain an additional 1-4 points of damage
    (from the cutting effect of the monofilament) during each round in
    which they struggle.

    Grenade Launcher (Wand of Death Eggs)

    Description: This dark gray, foot-long, inch thick tube is open at
    one end and closed at the other. There is a red bump on one side.

    Functioning: The closed end holds a standard power pack, a
    propellant pack, and all of the micro-circuits needed to fire the
    grenade launcher. The cap can be removed by simply unscrewing it.
    The red bump is a firing button. To use the launcher, drop a live
    grenade in it, aim it where you want the grenade to go, and press
    the firing button. With a soft plop, the grenade flies toward the
    aiming point. It takes one round to arm the grenade, load, and
    fire. The launcher has a maximum range of 300 feet, but is highly
    inaccurate ( + 5 to the hit roll) above 120 feet. Each new
    propellant and power pack inserted in the launcher is good for 24
    uses. Those packs already inside a launcher when it is discovered
    by the PCs are good for 2-24 uses. If the device is triggered while
    it contains more than one grenade, it explodes, doing 3-18 points
    of damage to the user plus any damage done by the grenades (which
    also explode).

    Hand Blaster (Wand of Sunflame)

    Description: This dark gray, L-shaped device is made from some
    smooth, dense substance and is molded to fit a human hand. The part
    that fits most comfortably in the palm is studded with tiny buttons
    and protrusions. The other part ends in a thin tube.

    Functioning: This small, easily concealed weapon works like a wand
    of fireballs (doing 6-36 points of damage at a range of 240 feet
    whenever a small stud in the front of the pistol grip is pressed).
    The weapon has a standard power pack in the grip. Moving a slide on
    the grip causes the weapon to eject its power pack; it can then be
    reloaded by simply sliding a fresh power pack into the bottom of
    the grip. Thumbing open a panel in the back of the grip exposes a
    vertical gauge whose red indicator line shows how many charges are
    left. The panel snaps shut when released. Each new power pack
    inserted in the weapon is good for 24 uses. The power pack already
    in a weapon when it is discovered by the PCs is good for 5-20 uses.
    Heavy Blaster (Staff of Sunflame)

    Description: This device actually looks more like an unwieldy club
    than a staff. The smooth, dense, dark gray substance from which it
    is manufactured is studded with arcane bumps and bulges and it is
    broader and heavier at one end, tapering to a thin tube at the
    other.

    Functioning: This shoulder-fired weapon works is the size of a
    crossbow (but is much lighter and is shaped like a rifle). It works
    exactly like a wand of fireballs, but does 8-48 points of damage at
    360 feet whenever a small stud in the underside of the stock is
    pressed). The weapon has a standard power pack in the stock. Moving
    a slide on the stock causes the weapon to eject its power pack; it
    can then be reloaded by simply sliding a fresh power pack into the
    butt-end of the stock. Thumbing open a panel in the top of the
    stock exposes a vertical gauge whose red indicator line shows how
    many charges are left. The panel snaps shut when released. Each new
    power pack inserted in the weapon is good for 24 uses. The power
    pack already in a weapon when it is discovered by the PCs is good
    for 5-20 uses.

    Implant (Talk Spell)

    Description: This item consists of a small metal and ceramic button
    in the back of the skull, just under the ear. This button is
    normally hidden under the skin, but may be revealed by a wound.

    Functioning: All aliens have a miniature transmitter-receiver
    implanted in their mastoid bone. This implant lets the alien have
    a two-way conversation with any other character who also has an
    implant or a communicator or with any device that is plugged into
    the communications network (a computer, for example). Implants have
    a range of just four miles. They can always receive anything being
    transmitted on their band. They only transmit the sounds made by
    the character in whom they are implanted when he gives the transmit signal (a specific combination of
    teeth clicks). Non-aliens commonly interpret the receipt and
    transmission of signals in this way as the result of some arcane
    spell, especially since the aliens usually communicate using their
    own battle language, which is not understandable by non-aliens.
    Unlike communicators, implants do not have a translator function.
    They have their own power source. An implant ceases to function if
    it is removed from the alien in whom it is implanted or if that
    alien is killed.

    Light Saber (Sword of Light)

    Description: This item is a six-inch long, one-inch diameter gray
    metal tube with a red lens of some sort at one end. The tube is
    banded with ridges of metal and contains a small plate near the
    lens. The plate is inset with a variety of studs and small flashing
    lights.

    Functioning: This is a light saber, a weapon designed for
    deep-space combat where it is desirable that pressure hulls not be
    damaged by casual blaster fire. The end with the lens emits a
    three-foot long by one-inch diameter controlled beam of light bent
    to form a lethal blade. Treat this weapon like a sword + 4. It is
    activated by pressing one of the studs in the control plate by the
    lens. The other studs are used to regulate the blade's length and
    width. The flashing lights are used to monitor its status and are for diagnostic purposes, only. The light
    saber is powered by a
    standard power pack inside the tube. The pack can be removed or
    replaced by pressing against one of the tube's ridges, causing an
    access panel to spring open. The panel snaps shut when pressed back
    into place. Each power pack is good for 12 minutes (72 rounds) of
    continuous operation.

    Medkit (Cube of Healing)

    Description: This item is a smooth, white 4-inch white cube. One
    side of the cube is covered with flashing lights and strange
    symbols. There is a small stud in one corner. The opposite side has
    dozens of shallow indentations. The remaining four sides are blank.
    Functioning: When the side with the shallow indentations is placed
    next to a character's skin and the medkit is turned on by twisting
    the stud, the item performs a medical exam on the character and
    displays the results (including its diagnosis,if any) by flashing
    lights and changing the symbols displayed. The results include a
    readout listing any treatment that it is performing. If the machine
    is not turned off within 10 seconds of a course of treatment being
    indicated, the medkit executes the treatment. This may include
    debriding and sealing any wound over which it is placed, slathering
    ointments of various kinds on burns or irritations and/or
    spray-injecting the patient with one or more drugs. The medkit
    doesn't actually heal the patient, but it causes normal (but not
    magical) healing to proceed at four times the normal pace. The med;
    it only works in this fashion when applied to humans. It isn't
    designed to treat non-humans. If used on a nonhuman (including a
    demi-human), the patient must make a Saving Throw vs. Poison or
    sustain 6-24 points of damage as a result of malpractice. Medkits
    don't use power packs; they have their own internal power source.
    Each medkit can boost the healing of 100 points of damage.

    Needler (Wand of Poisoned Dreams)

    Description: This dark gray, L-shaped device is made from some
    smooth, dense substance and is molded to fit a human hand. The part
    that fits most comfortably in the palm has a stud and several tiny
    protrusions. The other part ends in a thin tube.

    Functioning: This small, easily concealed weapon fires small hollow
    steel needles containing a paralyzing drug out to a range of 60
    feet whenever the stud in the front of the pistol grip is pressed.
    Entities hit by the tiny needles must make a Saving Throw vs.
    Paralysis. Those who fail their saving throw suffer 1-2 points of
    damage and are paralyzed for one hour. Those who make their saving
    throw suffer 1-2 points of damage, but are not paralyzed. The
    small, light-weight needles tend to shatter when they strike heavy
    armor ( + 5 to the hit roll when fired at characters in plate mail
    or monsters that are AC 3 or lower). The weapon has a standard
    power pack and a tiny ammo pack (the same size as the power pack)
    in the grip. Moving a slide on the grip causes the weapon to eject
    these packs; the weapon can then be reloaded by simply sliding
    fresh packs into the bottom of the grip. Each new power pack inserted in a needler has 24 charges
    (uses), and each ammo pack
    contains 24 needles. The packs already in a needler when it is
    discovered by the PCs are good for 5-20 uses. Thumbing open a panel
    in the back of the grip exposes a vertical gauge whose red
    indicator line shows how many charges are left. The panel snaps
    shut when released.

    Pressure Suit (Suit of Lights)

    Description: When inactive, this item looks like battle armor with
    a hood and a slightly larger box woven into the neck. When it is
    active, it gives the wearer a multicolored aura.

    Functioning: A pressure suit has the same characteristics as battle
    armor, but it also creates an atmospheric envelope around the
    wearer. Characters wearing a pressure suit are immune to the
    effects of heat, cold, and lack of atmosphere. The suit needs to be
    recharged after every 12 hours of use. Recharging consists of
    replacing the standard power pack that powers it and hooking the
    box woven into the neck up to a small nozzle found next to the
    keypad in any of Beagle's locks.

    Riot Stick (Wand of Pain)

    Description: This item is a 24-inch long, one-inch diameter, smooth
    white stick with a grip at one end. The butt of the grip can be
    twisted. Attached to the center of the butt end by a strap is a
    pair of odd, shiny black gauntlets.

    Functioning: This so-called riot stick is designed for use in
    controlling shipboard mutinies. Twisting the butt of the grip
    clockwise sends electrical current through the stick (but not the
    grip, which is insulated). The further clockwise the butt is
    twisted, the more current charges the stick. Small alien numerals
    along the grip show the 10 possible settings. At the lowest
    setting, an unprotected individual touched by the stick gets a
    minor jolt of electricity that does no damage, but does startle the
    individual. At the next lowest setting, the stick does 1-2 points
    of damage. At the third setting, it does 1-4 points of damage. At
    each setting above the third (4-10), it does two additional points
    of damage (for a maximum of 15-19 points at the tenth setting). The
    device is powered by a standard power pack inside the grip. The
    pack can be removed or replaced by twisting the grip
    counterclockwise from the off position, causing the butt of the
    grip to pop free and revealing the location of the power pack. The
    butt can be closed by twisting it clockwise. Each new power pack
    inserted in this item is good for 24 uses. Packs already in the
    item when it is discovered by the PCs have 5-20 charges (uses).

    Snoopers (Far Seers)

    Description: This item consists of a pair of short tubes joined
    along their sides by some rigid material. The tubes are filled with
    layers of some clear substance and can be seen through. Connected to the tubes is a strap of some
    flexible stretchy substance.

    Functioning: This item is actually a set of goggles that are held
    in place by an elastic strap. The "short tubes" contain lenses
    through which the user looks. Sensors in the sides of the snooper
    goggles react to the focus of the user's eyes, multiplying the
    effect of natural focus so that the harder the user looks at an
    object, the more it is magnified. At maximum focus, the user sees
    up to four times as clearly and four times as far as other
    characters. When the user stops focusing, the magnification steps
    back. Similar sensors compare the light requirements of the user's
    eyes with the amount of ambient light and multiply the brightness
    of available light sources like a starscope so that the user always
    sees as if it were daylight, providing there is any light to be
    multiplied. In situations where there is no light source available,
    the user need only toss his head in a certain way to kick in
    special heat sensors that give him infravision per the magic user
    spell of that name. Snoopers don't use power packs. However, their
    delicate lenses are easily broken. There is a 2 % chance per use
    that this item is made useless by damage.

    Translator Badge (Medallion of Speaking)

    Description: This item is a one-inch diameter button fixed to a
    pin, so that it can be attached to clothing. The button has two
    parts, a stationary center and an outer circle. A metal rim around
    the center contains a small arrow pointing toward the outer circle.
    The circle contains runes and revolves when turned. The center of
    the button contains two glowing runes one of which matches runes on
    the outer circle. Depressing the center causes the runes to change
    or disappear.

    Functioning: This item translates the spoken word into other
    languages. The words of the wearer are translated into the
    languages represented by the outer circle; all other speech is
    translated into the languages represented by the center. The arrow
    in the metal band is an indicator used to show the language into
    which the wearer wants his words to be translated. The item has a
    tiny speaker that broadcasts its translation in such a way that the
    translated words seem to be coming from the mouth of the speaker.
    Pressing the center of the item turns it on and off or changes the
    language into which the words of speakers other than the wearer are
    being translated. The glowing runes in the center correspond to the
    languages into which the various speakers' words are being
    translated. One of the runes on the outer circle is a "wild card"
    that represents the language of the first speaker whose words arc
    heard by the device after it is turned on. If the speaker's
    language is unknown, the device gradually builds up a vocabulary
    and grammar for that language by recording and analyzing the
    speaker's words. In order to assist it in this task, the button
    contains a small imaging device for use in recording noun referents
    and body language. Translators can be plugged into computers and
    can then download the data they contain directly into computer.
    They have their own built-in power source and are designed to be thrown away when power is depleted
    (after 5-20 months).


    Sergio :-)
    Adept Greytalker

    Joined: Jul 29, 2006
    Posts: 500
    From: Dantredun, MN

    Send private message
    Mon Aug 29, 2011 9:21 pm  

    rasgon wrote:

    A Guide to the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Setting actually mentioned two places associated with the Land of Black Ice that Greyhawk Adventures turned into only one.


    Good catch Rasgon! I hadn't compared those discrepancies.

    And thanks rol-oeste for digging up the Alien Devices text. We have a good little collection of free sources here.
    Apprentice Greytalker

    Joined: Aug 07, 2010
    Posts: 45
    From: Blackmoor

    Send private message
    Sun Oct 23, 2011 11:10 am  

    Missed this first time around.

    On my website I have tried to collect as much information about Blackmoor as possible. See links in my signature. :)

    The D20 Dave Arneson's Blackmoor line would require some adaptation to be used with Greyhawk, but I think that would be quite an interesting topic.

    -Havard
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    Adept Greytalker

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    Mon Oct 24, 2011 8:28 am  
    OD&D Blackmoor

    There's also the OD&D Supplement II which is called Blackmoor and the First Fantasy Campaign which places Blackmoor on a different planet. I don't know how that corresponds to the d20 Blackmoor book by Zeitgeist Games.

    http://www.acaeum.com/jg/ModPhotos/WMT1978a.html

    [img]http://www.acaeum.com/jg/ModPhotos/WMT1978a.html[/img]
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    Mon Oct 24, 2011 8:33 am  
    What's in it...

    In the OD&D supplement, there are Arneson's rules which include how to roll for where you hit in combat as well as his first published version of "Temple of the Frog."

    In the First Fantasy Campaign module, it describes Castle Blackmoor. The orcs in this module seem to be taken straight from The Lord of the Rings.
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    Mon Oct 24, 2011 9:01 am  
    Map

    http://www.acaeum.com/library/blackmoor.html
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    Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:50 pm  
    Re: What's in it...

    Raymond wrote:
    There's also the OD&D Supplement II which is called Blackmoor and the First Fantasy Campaign which places Blackmoor on a different planet. I don't know how that corresponds to the d20 Blackmoor book by Zeitgeist Games.

    http://www.acaeum.com/jg/ModPhotos/WMT1978a.html

    [img]http://www.acaeum.com/jg/ModPhotos/WMT1978a.html[/img]



    Does the FFC or Supp II reference which planet Blackmoor is on? Or are you thinking about the DA modules which are linked to Mystara?

    The ZGG line was (perhaps) deliberately vague on these things. It uses the FFC/DA maps of Blackmoor which dont quite match the Greyhawk version, so some tweaks will be required.

    Raymond wrote:
    In the OD&D supplement, there are Arneson's rules which include how to roll for where you hit in combat as well as his first published version of "Temple of the Frog."


    There are also other hints about the setting hidden here and there within the pages of that book.

    Quote:
    In the First Fantasy Campaign module, it describes Castle Blackmoor. The orcs in this module seem to be taken straight from The Lord of the Rings.


    The Tolkienesque Orc Tribes are straight from the original Chainmail Game IIRC.

    -Havard
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    Fri Oct 28, 2011 11:01 am  
    Planet References

    No, there are no planet references in the text that I can recall. There's just that one Judges Guild map that shows placement in the Judges Guild world at the same time Judges Guild was releasing FFC for Arneson.

    I have the impression that Arneson didn't consider his setting as placed on Oerth. Gygax placed Blackmoor on Oerth for fun as I understand it. Most people that got the OD&D supplements probably didn't have a problem making a choice to put it in the Judges Guild world or Oerth and probably combined all the settings somehow though later each company would expand on their settings and you probably end up with four different planet choices for Blackmoor. A lot of players may not even be familiar with the Judges Guild stuff to know there was another option (aside from the Mystara stuff). I didn't until about two years ago when I bought a copy of FFC on ebay. (I started collecting the OD&D licensed by TSR era stuff...but that got de-railed.)

    That's why I'm curious about the d20 stuff. I haven't read any of it and am wondering if Arneson moved his setting out of the Judges Guild planet to his own later. From an intellectual property standpoint, he probably did.
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    Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:54 pm  
    Re: Planet References

    Raymond wrote:
    No, there are no planet references in the text that I can recall. There's just that one Judges Guild map that shows placement in the Judges Guild world at the same time Judges Guild was releasing FFC for Arneson.


    Ah yes, I see what you mean. :)

    Quote:
    I have the impression that Arneson didn't consider his setting as placed on Oerth.


    Well, the most significant part of Arneson's campaign was played out between 1970-1976. Arneson may not have considered his setting part of Oerth, but he did consider it part of the Pre-Greyhawk C&C Society Setting. This is why he refers to the Great Kingdom, the Duchy of Ten/Tehn and also perhaps other entities which may have originated with Gygax, Kuntz or some of the other active groups at the time, which later ended up incorporated into Greyhawk.


    Quote:
    Gygax placed Blackmoor on Oerth for fun as I understand it.


    As you probably know Greyhawk also sprung out of the C&C Setting, but many things were changed along the way. While the name Blackmoor was used, it doest seem like any attempt was made to make GH Blackmoor look much like Arneson's Blackmoor. My personal theory is that Arneson's Blackmoor ought to have been placed where Ratik is if they had wanted the geography and political landscape to fit more with Arneson's campaign.

    Quote:
    That's why I'm curious about the d20 stuff. I haven't read any of it and am wondering if Arneson moved his setting out of the Judges Guild planet to his own later. From an intellectual property standpoint, he probably did.


    Given the IP situation, ZGG were prevented from making any references to Greyhawk, Mystara or the Wilderlands. However, the focus on those books is on the local setting, so that it can be adapted to any of the above with only limited work.

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    Sun Oct 30, 2011 10:20 pm  
    Re: Planet References

    Havard wrote:

    Quote:
    Gygax placed Blackmoor on Oerth for fun as I understand it.


    As you probably know Greyhawk also sprung out of the C&C Setting, but many things were changed along the way. While the name Blackmoor was used, it doest seem like any attempt was made to make GH Blackmoor look much like Arneson's Blackmoor. My personal theory is that Arneson's Blackmoor ought to have been placed where Ratik is if they had wanted the geography and political landscape to fit more with Arneson's campaign.


    As we know, the Gygax OC map was a loose reversal of North America, with the Chicago and Milwaukee becoming Greyhawk and Dyvers. What I read somewhere that might not be common knowledge, is that Gygax tacked an honorary version of "Blackmoor" up north because Arnerson's campaign was based in Minneapolis. This rough Minneapolis/Wisconsin/Chicago relationship seems to have been maintained in the development of the the Flanaess map.
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    Mon Oct 31, 2011 7:12 am  
    Help?

    Iressi, is that the kind of information you wanted?
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    Fri Nov 04, 2011 7:58 am  
    Implied

    Oh, and I think it's implied, but I thought I'd better be explict for some readers...since Blackmoor was the first campaign setting, I don't know if Arneson had thought about on what type of world his setting existed but it couldn't have orignially been the Judges Guild one because Blackmoor was first and therefore anything else wouldn't have been original to what he created for himself before publishing something to the public. Who knows, maybe he thought of it as a version of Earth.
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    Sat Nov 05, 2011 9:20 am  
    Re: Implied

    Raymond wrote:
    Oh, and I think it's implied, but I thought I'd better be explict for some readers...since Blackmoor was the first campaign setting, I don't know if Arneson had thought about on what type of world his setting existed but it couldn't have orignially been the Judges Guild one because Blackmoor was first and therefore anything else wouldn't have been original to what he created for himself before publishing something to the public. Who knows, maybe he thought of it as a version of Earth.


    I think he had many different ideas about this. But in general his focus were the things that would affect the game. Much of the rest was kept vague until the players did something that would need Arneson to make up his mind about it.

    The one thing we do know was that he used the C&C Newsletter as a basis for ideas about Blackmoor's surroundings. This is where he got the Great Kingdom and the Duchy of Ten from; both central elements in his campaign. Also, there were crossovers to Jon Snider's Star Probe/Star Empires game which gave rise to space ships and aliens showing up from time to time.

    -Havard
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