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    Treasures of the Wegwuir
    Posted on Fri, December 21, 2007 by Dongul
    kirt writes "This article gives tables for the placement of treasures on individual Wolf Nomads and within their camps. The tables are constructed to yield the same gp value as the standard AD&D 1st Edition treasure tables, but to give results more specific to the Wolf Nomad culture: mostly furs, horses, and gems. Thus, a DM whose campaign enters the lands of the Wegwuir now has a tool for the rapid generation of treasures with site-specific flavor.

    Treasures of the Wegwuir
    By: kirt

    Individual Treasure

    Procedure:
    Individual treasure for Wolf Nomads encountered as hunting or raiding parties can usually be rolled after the encounter if necessary – they will not, in general, have anything that affects combat, with the exception of leader types who may have superior armor (see below).

    For each leveled nomad, the chance of having a superior scimitar and superior armor may be checked (see below), and then each nomad may roll once on the “individual treasure” table given.

    A group of wolf nomads is typically outfitted as follows (see 1e MM68 and UA20):

    20% Lancer:
    Medium war horse (no barding)
    Leather armor, small wooden shield, light lance, scimitar
    10% Elite Mounted Archer
    Medium war horse (no barding)
    Leather armor, composite short bow, scimitar
    20% Skirmisher
    Light war horse (no barding)
    Small wooden shield, light lance, scimitar
    50% Mounted Archer
    Light war horse (no barding)
    Composite short bow, knife

    A typical Wolf Nomad carries items essential for survival on the steppes, but of little value to the civilized world. The single most valuable possession to outsiders is the horse. Wolf Nomad horses are almost always treated as light or medium war horses.

    Fast horses of the type called “riding horses” by civilized people are very rare among the nomads, and usually reserved for the messengers or racing stables of very important leaders. Such horses are too frail to haul heavy loads and so are of little use in moving between camps. Also, they have a hard time defending themselves against wolf packs and other natural predators when turned out to graze by themselves, which nomad horses are much of the time. Thus, the nomads typically use the slower but sturdier breeds characterized as light and medium war horses.

    Mounts equivalent to heavy war horses are also rare. The nomads lack the extensive breeding programs required to create and maintain these giants, as nomad horses typically mate with wild horses when given the opportunity. A nomad who found a “heavy” war horse would consider it too slow, both in tactical and strategic movement, and too demanding in terms of its food consumption (requiring much grain in addition to grass forage and unlikely to survive a lean winter).

    Thus, the breeds of horses favored by the nomads can be characterized as being either light war horses (typically used by mounted archers) or medium war horses (typically used by lancers). While the nomad horses have the “stat blocks” as these types, their behavior is very different from the trained war horses of civilized lands, and they are not salable in most markets.

    Both nomad and civilized horse breeds are trained to endure the sights, sounds, and smells of battle without spooking, and to follow the commands of their rider including those to attack, but there the similarity ends. Civilized war horses generally have a single rider over their lifetimes, or at most a few if they have changed hands in a tournament. The horses recognize their riders and respond to their commands, alone. Should a rider fall in combat the horse is often trained to stand over it, attacking those who come near until a signal it has learned is made by the rider’s allies. Even without the direction of the rider, the horse will continue to attack those it takes to be its rider’s foes. The horse is used to being taken care of and will generally stay where it is put until its rider takes it somewhere else. The horse has been trained to wear barding of different types and to move in dense formations.

    Nomad horses are much less bound to a single rider. They are frequently given, exchanged, or stolen, and so are trained to respond to whatever rider is on them at the moment. If a horse’s rider is knocked unconscious but is still mounted, the horse will carry the rider out of combat, but if the rider falls from the saddle it is usually ignored and the horse will accept being led away by another person. They are taught to come when called, by a few signal whistles commonly known among the nomads, and will even respond to callers they don’t know. They are often left to forage for themselves when not in use and are resourceful about finding their own food and water. A civilized war horse whose meal was delayed would wait patiently in its stall or corral. A nomad horse, at the first signs of hunger, would attempt to jump fence and look for its own meal. Nomad horses have often never worn barding and will not permit it to be put on them, and they are seldom trained to ride in dense formations.

    Thus, a nomad horse, while valuable, has fewer resale opportunities than a civilized horse. There are markets for Wolf Nomad horses in Eru-Tovar (although many questions will be asked about how the horses were obtained) and in Yecha (no questions asked). There are small markets in Traft and Schwartzenbruin, where the horses are typically bought by adventurers and mercenary cavalry. There are no official markets in Furyondy, although a horse might be individually salable to a scout or ranger. The people of the Bandit Lands prize Wolf Nomad horses, and they are willing to pay more dearly than in other markets – although any seller faces the possibility of confiscation of the horses before sale by local authority as a matter of “state necessity”. A Wolf Nomad horse should generally be worth about three-quarters of what a civilized warhorse of the same stats would be worth. In my campaign, I list civilized light warhorses at 450gp and nomad horses at 300gp. Civilized medium war horses sell for 675gp and nomad horses for 500gp.

    After the horse, the next most valuable possessions of a typical Wolf Nomad are arms.

    The knives are of no importance – often they are not even of metal, and valuable only as curios.

    The scimitars are typically of poor workmanship, as the nomads are not skilled metallurgists. There is a 10% chance per level of the nomad that the scimitar employed will actually be a Baklunish import of good quality which is salable for normal price (I use half market listing when PC’s are attempting to sell used goods). For those whose weapons are Baklunish, there is a flat 10% chance that the weapon is actually of fine steel and excellent workmanship and could be sold for three to five times list price.

    The lances of the nomads are little more than long spears, typically decorated with feathers and, if the lancer has killed an opponent in combat, wolf tails. These have little resale value.

    The composite bows of the nomads are of excellent quality and are highly sought after in other lands by those few troops who employ them (typically adventurers, mercenaries, and bandits). They will sell for between 50% to 75% of list new market price. Generally any expedition against the nomads would find it possible to collect far more bows than there is a market for at any given time in one place.

    The armor of the nomads is generally light and in ill-repair and not worth the bother of transporting it for sale. A rare exception is elven chain: there is a 1% per level chance that an individual nomad will have a set of human-sized elven chain. These suits were originally given to the nomads by the elves of the Vesve during the first expansion of Iuz, as a way of encouraging the nomads to stand against him and so relieve some of the pressure faced by the forest. In general, the superstitious nomads do not know the mail is of elven origin and would not wear it if they did. The suits have typically been handed down over generations and are thought to have been gifts from ancestral spirits.

    Finally, a nomad may carry more traditional treasure. An individual “nomad” is treasure type “L”, which is listed as 2-12 gp. However, rather than carry coins, nomads are more likely to have decorated clothes or jewelry trinkets. For each nomad, the DM should roll 2d6 on the following chart. For nomads with character levels, add one plus the level to the roll.


    Roll
    value
    item
    2
    2
    copper decorations on clothing
    3
    3
    bronze decoration on clothing, gear, or tack
    4
    4
    quillwork on clothing*
    5
    5
    raccoon cap or raccoon trim on clothing
    6
    6
    copper bracelet, earring, pendant
    7
    7
    silver decoration on clothing, gear, or tack
    8
    8
    rabbit trim on clothing or bag
    9
    9
    silver bracelet, earring, pendant
    10
    10
    pendant with base 10gp gem
    11
    11
    beadwork decoration on clothing*
    12
    12
    bear claw necklace*
    13
    17
    base 10gp gem set in copper bracelet
    14
    19
    base 10gp gem set in silver medallion
    15
    20
    bear trim on clothing
    16
    20
    wolf trim on clothing
    17
    22
    wolf tail decoration on lance*
    18
    25
    seal trim on clothing
    19
    30
    red fox trim on clothing
    20
    40
    silver bracer or choker set with 2 matched base 10gp gems
    21
    50
    blue fox trim on clothing
    22
    75
    winter wolf trim on clothing

    Values given are in gp and are sale values. Items marked with an asterisk* have the value shown for the purpose of barter or sale within Wolf Nomad lands. Outside of these lands, the items would be worth much less, and then only to collectors.


    Treasure Found in Camps (lairs)

    If there is a chance that the PC’s will be recovering treasure from a Wolf Nomad camp, the treasure should be rolled first, because location will be important. Horses could be placed in a corral or tied to posts, but more likely will be free-roaming near the camp. Given the chance, most fleeing nomads will take light trasures with them. Magic items will be used against attackers if possible.

    Procedure: DM's should find the size of the camp (basic warriers only, not non-combatants or leaders) and roll once on each of the following tables. Sometimes a result will require additional rolling on another table.

    “The Copper Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 30% chance of the lair having one to three thousand copper pieces (value five to fifteen gp, average value per camp 1.5 to 4.5 gp considering 30% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d6 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 20 nomads over 180, -1 per 20 nomads under 150.
    Roll
    gp value
    item
    0 or less
    0
    nothing
    1
    1
    grey fox pelt
    2
    2
    wolf pelt
    3
    3
    mountain lion pelt
    4
    4
    bear hide
    5
    5
    red fox pelt
    6
    6
    blue fox pelt
    7
    7
    copper kettle
    8
    8
    bobcat pelt
    9
    9
    lynx pelt
    10
    10
    pipestone pipe or bowl
    11
    11
    mink pelt
    12
    12
    ermine pelt

    “The Silver Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 25% chance of the lair having one to four thousand silver pieces (value fifty to two hundred gp, average value per camp 12.5 to 50 gp considering 25% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d4 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 30 nomads over 180, -1 per 30 nomads under 150.
    Roll
    gp value
    item
    0 or less
    0 to 3
    roll once on copper table (use copper table adjustment for nomad number)
    1
    12.5
    bronze kettle
    2
    20
    iron kettle
    3
    35
    silver bracelet set with 2 matched base 10gp gems
    4
    50
    blue fox trim on clothing
    5
    60
    three iron kettles
    6
    75
    set of wolverine ruff hooded jacket (25) and sealskin boots (50)*
    7
    85
    set of winter wolf trim clothing and matching scabbard
    8
    100
    white fox pelt

    “The Electrum Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 25% chance of the lair having one to four thousand electrum pieces (value five hundred to two thousand gp, average value per camp 125 to 500 gp considering 25% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d4 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 30 nomads over 180, -1 per 30 nomads under 150.
    Roll
    gp value
    item
    0 or less
    0 to 35
    roll once on silver table (use silver table adjustment for nomad number)
    1
    125
    ten bronze kettles
    2
    200
    ten iron kettles
    3
    350
    electrum necklace
    4
    500
    two lynx capes
    5
    600
    two red fox jackets
    6
    750
    bobcat jacket (250) and blue fox cape (500)
    7
    850
    calf-length red fox robe
    8
    1000
    woman's long dress with white fox trim

    “The Gold Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 30% chance of the lair having one to four thousand gold pieces (value one to four thousand gp, average value per camp 300 to 1200 gp considering 30% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d4 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 30 nomads over 180, -1 per 30 nomads under 150.

    Roll
    gp value
    item
    0 or less
    0 to 350
    roll once on electrum table (use electrum table adjustment for nomad number)
    1
    300
    silver necklace
    2
    600
    heavy electrum necklace
    3
    900
    grey fox robe (400) and lynx rug (500)
    4
    1200
    sacred bundle with sable (200) and ceremonial robe with white tiger trim (1000)
    5
    1500
    Five light war horses (300 each) or three medium war horses (500 each)
    6
    1800
    heavy electrum medallion set with twelve perfectly matched base 10gp gems
    7
    2100
    blue fox robe (1500), four ermine-trim dresses (150 each)
    8
    2400
    winter wolf cape

    “The Platinum Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 30% chance of the lair having one to six hundred platinum pieces (value five hundred to three thousand gp, average value per camp 150 to 900 gp considering 30% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d6 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 20 nomads over 180, -1 per 20 nomads under 150.

    Roll
    gp value
    item
    0 or less
    0 to 350
    roll once on electrum table (use electrum table adjustment for nomad number)
    1
    150
    Jacket with snow leopard trim
    2
    300
    Light war horse
    3
    450
    matched engraved electrum bracers
    4
    600
    three bear rugs (200 each)
    5
    750
    seal blanket (250) and bobcat robe (500)
    6
    900
    three light war horses (300 each)
    7
    1050
    two medium war horses (500 each)
    8
    varies
    roll unmodified d6 on electrum table and accumulate until total value is >1000gp
    9
    1350
    matched set of electrum bracers, choker, and grieves with matching 10gp gems
    10
    1500
    three medium war horses
    11
    varies
    roll unmodified d6 on electrum table and accumulate until total value is >1500gp
    12
    1800
    six light war horses (300 each)

    “The Gems Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 55% chance of the lair having between ten and sixty gems (average value 9625 gp, average value per camp about 5300gp considering 55% chance to be there). This is replaced with a single d6 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +1 per 20 nomads over 180, -1 per 20 nomads under 150. Note that the table usually yields a large number of gems. This is because the average value of a gem in standard tables (1eDMG p. 26) is 275gp, but gems indigenous to the Wolf Nomad lands are base 10gp, thus many more gems are needed to meet the values previously established.

    Roll
    gp value
    item
    -3 or less
    100
    Ten unmatched base 10gp gems
    -2
    190
    Nineteen unmatched base 10gp gems
    -1
    400
    Forty unmatched base 10gp gems
    0
    750
    Seventy-five unmatched base 10gp gems
    1
    1500
    One hundred fifty unmatched base 10 gp gems
    2
    3000
    Three hundred unmatched base 10gp gems
    3
    4500
    Four hundred fifty unmatched base 10 gp gems
    4
    6000
    Six hundred unmatched base 10gp gems
    5
    7500
    Ermine coat
    6
    9000
    Snow leopard coat (7500) and one hundred fifty unmatched base 10gp gems
    7
    10500
    White tiger robe
    8
    12000
    Short winter wolf cape (2000) and sable coat (10000)
    9
    13500
    White fox robe (10000) and mink cape (3000)
    10
    15000
    Three mink coats (5000 each)
    11
    16500
    Three winter wolf robes (5000 each) and three medium warhorses (500 each)
    12
    18000
    Four jackets: sable (5000), white fox (5000), white tiger (5000), and mink (3000)

    “The Jewelry Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 50% chance of the lair having between five and thirty pieces of jewelry. This is replaced with a single 5d6 roll on the following table. The roll should be adjusted by number of nomads in the camp as follows: +3.5 per 20 nomads over 180, -3.5 per 20 nomads under 150.

    Roll
    item
    -10 or less
    roll unmodified d4 once on electrum table
    -9 to -5
    roll unmodified d4 on electrum table and accumulate until total value is more than 750gp
    -4 to 0
    roll unmodified d6 on platinum table and accumulate until total value is more than 1500gp
    1 or more
    standard jewelry items, equal in number to half adjusted roll (round down)

    “The Magic Table”
    Treasure Type Z gives a 50% chance of the lair having 3 magic items of any nature. Given that Wolf Nomads are extremely suspicious of arcane magic, these should be of only divine nature – typically made by and for priests of the ancestor-worshipping nomads (in my campaign, shamans – see http://www.canonfire.com/cf/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=333). Such items as spell scrolls, potions of healing, and soil from graves for the casting of Summon Heroic Dead are appropriate.

    Background assumptions used in the article:

    I treat the Wolf Nomads as being represented by the first edition Monster Manual entry for Men – Dervish (Nomad) (p.68). As such, they are given treasure type “L” (individual) and “Z” (lair). From this I derive the value of the treasure available.

    I convert the treasures given to those most likely found among the Wolf Nomads. WoG gives the lands of the Wolf Nomads as having the resources of “furs, copper” (p.42). I assume that furs are the principle source of treasure value for the nomads, copper less so. Copper is present in decoration and jewelry but simply does not hold the value that furs do. To the south of the Nomads lies Perrenland, also with the resource of “copper” (WoG p. 30). To the west are the Tiger Nomads, with the resources of “furs, silver, gems (I)” (WoG p.38, and p.18 explains that gems (I) have base value 10gp). I thus assume that Wolf Nomad treasure includes fair amounts of silver and low value gems, obtained from trade and raiding with the Tiger Nomads. Finally, to the east of the Nomads is the land of Iuz, with the resources of “furs, electrum” (WoG p.27), so I assume that Wolf Nomad hordes include electrum as well, typically in the form of jewelry.

    Coins would be of little practical use among the nomads, except for those in Eru-Tovar. Nomads in the hinterland are largely self-sufficient, and obtain the few goods that they do need mostly through barter. Furthermore, they have no means of authenticating coins, and so do not trust their value. Their nomadic lifestyle places a premium on value-per-weight of items, and coins simply are too heavy to carry from one place to another for the rare occasions in which they might be used. Wolf nomad items tend to be either strictly utilitarian or highly valuable and obviously ceremonial.

    In conclusion, Wolf Nomad treasure on the low end is largely composed of personal decorations such as copper, silver, and electrum jewelry and small gemstones. On the high end are almost entirely horses and furs, with the occasional valuable piece of jewelry of foreign origin. Coins, magic items, and items of gold or platinum are very rare, as are items of value that are not for personal adornment, such as artwork, tapestries, statuary, etc.

    For the values and identities of furs, I am greatly indebted to the Canonfire! article “Fashion in the Flanaess – Furs” by GVDammerung. (http://www.canonfire.com/cf/modules.phpname=News&file=article&sid=779)
    I have taken his suggestions for the values of furs largely intact. I have used primarily furs from animals of North American or holarctic distribution, as I see these as being endemic to the Wolf Nomad hunting grounds (fox, wolf, mink, ermine, bear, seal, sable, lynx, bobcat). I include some animals of strictly Eurasian distribution more rarely, and see them as being imports from Baklunish lands (snow leopard, white tiger). I do not include his suggestions of Chinchilla, Chamois, Panther, or Ocelot. I have added a few lesser furs not included in his article (rabbit, mountain lion, raccoon, wolverine).

    The treasure tables, as originally printed in the first edition MM, gave a percent chance for a certain kind of treasure, and then a range of amount should that type of treasure be indicated. I prefer a more uniform distribution, so my tables reduce the amount of treasure of each type, but assume that it is always found. The two methods produce the same average values.

    Furthermore, I adjust the value of the treasure found in lairs based on the size of the nomad band. This actually follows the suggestion given in the MM on p.5. The “number appearing” for nomads on page 68 is given as “30-300”. Although there are multiple ways of generating this range, I assume it refers to 30d10, which has an average value of 165. I thus lower the amount of treasure for bands of less than 150 and raise it for those of more than 180.
    "
     
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    Re: Treasures of the Wegwuir (Score: 1)
    by Mystic-Scholar on Mon, September 28, 2009
    (User Info | Send a Message) http://mysticscholar.blogspot.com/
    The author unquestionably put a lot of effort into this article and it was well worth it. It suits the Wolf Nomads well, one shouldn't expect to find great treasure among them, as their outlook would be different than that of more "civilized" cultures. Desert people value water, not gold, the Wolf Nomads would have a similar outlook; horses vs gold.

    A good item for DM's to have at hand. It also makes one wonder whether raiding the Wolf Nomads is worth the effort. :)




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