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    Re: Upon the Rivalries and Conflicts of Knightly Orders, Part III (Score: 1)
    by CruelSummerLord on Sat, February 05, 2005
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    I should explain my reasoning here...just about everything I write for Canonfire is my own personal take on things, borrowing from canon what I like and tossing out the rest. In some articles (such as An Alternative View of the Greyhawk Wars), I try to weave in pieces of canon that fit the overall work I'm going for. Hence why I can have the Great Kingdom split into two smaller kingdoms as it does in canon, but Tenh actually _wins_ its battles against the Pale, Stonehold and the Bandits, even as it gets ravaged.

    I believe this is truly what Greyhawk is about-taking what you like from the established canon and tossing out the rest. I have a healthy skepticism for recent canon, especially if it has the names Reynolds or Cook on it (with the obvious exception of the LGG, since the names of Greyhawk's Three Magi-Holian, Weining and Mona-guarantee quality.)

    I might accept most of what is written about the church of Hieroneous in the LGG, but toss out the part about how he promotes the longsword now as well, something I dismiss IMC as pure nonsense. The bit about the Tenhas being "arrogant and lazy" is a gross overexaggeration, owing more to ignorance and racism than anything else. Ivid is twisted, demented, and fiend-ridden, but he's also not a typical two-dimensional evil despot, either.


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